5-minute forest fruit smoothie with chia seed

Give yourself this great start to your day, or make it as a between-meals snack!

SSD Voedingsmethode

Ingredients

Serves 2

  • 2 cups oat milk
  • More oat milk (if you prefer your smoothie to be thinner)
  • 1 large slice of fresh ginger, peeled
  • 2 cups mixed forest fruits (frozen)
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds

Let the chia seeds soak for 25 minutes in 1 cup of oat milk.  This ensures that the important substances (omega 3 fatty acids, proteins, vitamins and minerals) are absorbed much better by your body. Then put all the ingredients in a blender and purée until you have a nice silky smoothie.

TIP: Always make a double batch so you have a quick and healthy option in the refrigerator. Store your drink in a glass container with an airtight lid. Seal your container tightly and store in the refrigerator. Bonus: Add lemon juice to your smoothie or juice.

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Sit Smart Diet

Are you a sweet tooth?

This smoothie does not actually require a sweetener. But if you want it to be a little bit sweeter, preferably use Erythritol (order online) or a drop of pure vanilla extract.

Good to know: Purple foods are extremely healthy for people with sci

Eating (and drinking) purple foods is incredibly healthy [1] – especially for people with spinal cord injury! Think of blueberries, black currants, cherries, blue grapes, cranberries, blackberries, plums, red cabbage, purple carrots, purple cauliflower, eggplant, red onion, beetroot and purple sweet potato (one of my favorites, I eat them daily).

Anthocyanins

Purple foods contain so-called “anthocyanins”, an antioxidant that gives these foods their deep, red, purple or blue hues. These antioxidants help in the fight against free radicals that cause aging.

Anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetes

Anthocyanins in purple food have an anti-inflammatory effect [2], help stabilize blood sugar and increase your insulin sensitivity [3], strengthen your immune system [4], improve vascular function, prevent hardening of the arteries, cardio vascular disease [5, 6, 7] and fight cognitive decline. [8, 9, 10, 11]

Prevention of urinary tract infections

Vegetables such as purple cauliflower, purple carrots and purple cabbage contain the same plant pigment, anthocyanin, that is responsible for the UTI-fighting power of cranberries. Lab studies show that anthocyanin compounds fight H. pylori, the bacteria that promotes stomach ulcers and urinary tract infections. [12, 13]. Study also shows that anthocyanins also have an anti tumor effect and reduce proliferation of human colon cancer cells. [14, 15, 16]

Good for the heart and to reduce high blood pressure

Black currants can lower “bad” LDL cholesterol by up to 13 percent while raising “good” HDL cholesterol. And according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the purple sweet potato also helps to reduce high blood pressure. [17] Other highly pigmented foods, such as red beet or cranberries, have the same properties.

References

[1] Mary Ann Lila. Anthocyanins and Human Health: An In Vitro Investigative Approach. J Biomed Biotechnol. 2004 Dec 1; 2004(5): 306–313.

[2]  S. Kelley, R. Rasooly, R. A. Jacob, A. A. Kader, B. E. Mackey. Consumption of Bing sweet cherries lowers circulating concentrations of inflammation markers in healthy men and women. J. Nutr. 2006 136(4):981 – 986

[3] Tarun Belwal,1 Seyed Fazel Nabavi,2 Seyed Mohammad Nabavi,2 and Solomon Habtemariam3,*.Dietary Anthocyanins and Insulin Resistance: When Food Becomes a Medicine. Nutrients. 2017 Oct; 9(10): 111

[4] Mary Ann Lila. Anthocyanins and Human Health: An In Vitro Investigative Approach. J Biomed Biotechnol. 2004 Dec 1; 2004(5): 306–313.

[5] Del Bo’ C, Porrini M, Fracassetti D, Campolo J, Klimis-Zacas D, Riso P. A single serving of blueberry (V. corymbosum) modulates peripheral arterial dysfunction induced by acute cigarette smoking in young volunteers: a randomized-controlled trial. Food Funct. 2014;5(12):3107-311.

[6] Rodriguez-Mateos A1, Rendeiro C, Bergillos-Meca T, Tabatabaee S, George TW, Heiss C, Spencer JP. Intake and time dependence of blueberry flavonoid-induced improvements in vascular function: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study with mechanistic insights into biological activity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Nov;98(5):1179-91.

[7] Rodriguez-Mateos A, Del Pino-García R, George TW, Vidal-Diez A, Heiss C, Spencer JP. Impact of processing on the bioavailability and vascular effects of blueberry (poly)phenols. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2014;58(10):1952-1961.

[8] A. Joseph, B. Shukitt-Hale, N. A. Denisova, D. Bielinski, A. Martin, J. J. McEwen, P. C. Bickford. Reversals of age-related declines in neuronal signal transduction, cognitive, and motor behavioral deficits with blueberry, spinach, or strawberry dietary supplementation. J. Neurosci. 1999 19(18):8114 – 8121.

[9] Krikorian, T. A. Nash, M. D. Shidler, B. Shukitt-Hale, J. A. Joseph. Concord grape juice supplementation improves memory function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Br. J. Nutr. 2010 103(5):730 – 734.

[10] Shukitt-Hale. Blueberries and neuronal aging. Gerontology 2012 58(6):518 – 523.

[11] E. Devore, J. H. Kang, M. M. B. Breteler, F. Grodstein. Dietary intakes of berries and flavonoids in relation to cognitive decline. Ann. Neurol. 2012 72(1):135 – 143.

[12] Ohnishi R1, Ito H, Kasajima N, Kaneda M, Kariyama R, Kumon H, Hatano T, Yoshida T. Urinary excretion of anthocyanins in humans after cranberry juice ingestion. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2006 Jul;70(7):1681-7.

[13] Marcelo Hisano,I Homero Bruschini,I Antonio Carlos Nicodemo,II and Miguel SrougiI. Clinics (Sao Paulo). Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention. 2012 Jun; 67(6): 661–667.

[14] Hou D.X. Potential mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anthocyanins. Curr Mol Med. 2003;3(2):149–159.

[15] Kang S, Seeram N, Nair M, Bourquin L. Tart cherry anthocyanins inhibit tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and reduce proliferation of human colon cancer cells. Cancer Lett. 2003;194(1):13–19.

[16] Koide T, Hashimoto Y, Kamei H, Kojima T, Hasegawa M, Terabe K. Antitumor effect of anthocyanin fractions extracted from red soybeans and red beans in vitro and in vivo. Cancer Biother Radiopharm. 1997;12(4):277–280.

[17] Tomoyuki OKI, 1 , * Mitsuyoshi KANO, 2 Osamu WATANABE, 3 Kazuhisa GOTO, 4 Esther BOELSMA, 5Fumiyasu ISHIKAWA, 1 and Ikuo SUDA 1. Effect of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage on health-related biomarkers and safety parameters in Caucasian subjects with elevated levels of blood pressure and liver function biomarkers: a 4-week, open-label, non-comparative trial. Biosci Microbiota Food Health. 2016; 35(3): 129–136.